June 30 Update: Hot Weather Alert Extended to July 1 for Most of the PJM Region

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PJM has extended its Hot Weather Alert to July 1 for its entire service area, except for the ComEd region in Illinois.

A Hot Weather Alert helps to prepare transmission and generation personnel and facilities for extreme heat and/or humidity that may cause capacity problems on the grid. Temperatures are expected to remain above 90 degrees through July 1, which drives up the demand for electricity.

A Hot Weather Alert is currently in effect for the entire PJM footprint. As of 8 a.m. June 30, electricity use is expected to peak around 139,000 MW for June 30, and around 141,500 MW for July 1.

Original Story: PJM Issues Hot Weather Alert for June 30

PJM has issued a Hot Weather Alert for its entire footprint for June 30 in anticipation of 90-degree weather.

A Hot Weather Alert helps to prepare transmission and generation personnel and facilities for extreme heat and/or humidity that may cause capacity problems on the grid. Temperatures are expected to go above 90 degrees, which drives up the demand for electricity.

PJM is prepared to serve a forecasted summer peak demand for electricity of approximately 149,000 MW but has performed reliability studies at even higher loads – in excess of 157,000 MW. PJM has approximately 185,000 MW of installed generating capacity available to meet customer needs, with sufficient resources available in reserve to cover generation that is unexpectedly unavailable or for other unanticipated changes in demand.

Last year’s peak demand was approximately 149,000 MW.

A dedicated team of operators uses sophisticated technology to balance supply and demand and direct the power grid 24/7 from PJM’s control rooms. They prepare multiple potential scenarios that could be impacted by weather, emergency conditions or equipment failure. They adjust resource output with changes in demand and ensure that no transmission lines or facilities are overloaded. The team also watches for unusual conditions and reacts to them to protect the electricity supply. Read more about how PJM forecasts electricity demand on the PJM Learning Center.